Black Lives Matter calls to boycott white companies at Christmas – "Build Black community”


Martin Lewis on buying Christmas gifts during Black Friday sales

The group, which came to prominence following the murder of George Floyd by a Minneapolis police officer in 2020, claims: “#BlackXmas challenges us to shake off the chains of consumerism and step fully into our own collective power, to build new traditions, and run an offence as well as a defence.” Urging consumers to come together, the group stated: “Let’s harness our economic power to disrupt white-supremacist-capitalism and build Black community.”

The Black Lives Matter states: “We’re dreaming of a #BlackXmas. That means no spending with white companies from Black Friday until New Years Day.”

The boycott aims to apply the ideology for the whole month of December.

The group suggest three ways for its supporters to take part in Black Xmas: Build Black, Buy Black, and Bank Black.

The group is encouraging its followers to “buy exclusively from Black-owned businesses” claiming “white-supremacist-capitalism uses policing to protect profits and steal Black life.”

But many on social media slammed the idea as racist and “segregating”.

Several people questioned what would happen if white people called for a month-long boycott of black-owned companies.

BLM

BLM are calling for a boycott of ‘white companies’ (Image: Getty)

George Floyd

BLM came to global prominence following the murder of George Floyd (Image: Getty)

Taking to Twitter to question the strategy, Ash Hirani said: “My heart sank when I saw this article about the #blacklivesmatter campaign for a #BlackXmas.”

He added: “I’ve heard of fighting fire with fire, but I’ve never heard of fighting racism with racism.”

Equally concerned over the boycott, NationalBlkForecast said: “If you wholeheartedly support #BuyBlack and #BlackXmas simply because of the race involved, then you’re #racist.”

READ MORE:
Yorkshire announce entire coaching staff to leave amid racism scandal

Opposing Tweet

Many opposed to the BLM boycott (Image: Twitter)

Racist

Some have hailed the call as racist (Image: Twitter)

Yet the BLM movement added to its justification.

The official website said: “#BlackXmas is about being self-determined and dismantling existing structures by building new, and more viable, beneficial ones…in the names of our mightiest and most righteous warrior Ancestors, in the names of all those stolen by police violence, in honour of our community, and as a commitment to the generations to come.”

According to Nielsen research group, black buying power in 2020 equalled $1.57 trillion.

The Nielsen report also found that black shoppers are increasingly using their money to support companies that have tailor-made messaging to target black buyers.

During the pandemic, black business owners had to shut their doors for good at more than twice the rate that white businesses did between February 2020 and April 2020, CNBC reported.

DON’T MISS:
Liz Truss hails £18m boost for UK as Joe Biden backs down from US ban [REVEAL]
EU ‘hell-bent on punishing us!’ Britons savage Remainers wish [COMMENT]
Father’s pain after 12-year-old dies in ski crash [INSIGHT]

Black Friday

Some calls have been made to change the name of ‘Black Friday’ over racism concerns (Image: Getty)

However, it stated that the murder of George Floyd led to a surge in shoppers supporting black-owned businesses.

According to a survey by the Black Chamber of Commerce, around 75% of Black-owned small businesses saw upticks in customers in the two months following Floyd’s death.

In the run-up to Black Friday, groups of students at a University in the United States suggested changing the name of the bargain bonanza day, suggesting it was racist.

However, on learning that Black Friday actually related to bringing businesses out of the red (debt) and into the black (credit), many students changed their minds.

Shoppers

Black-owned businesses in London have a total turnover of almost £4.5 billion. (Image: Getty)

This is not the first time the group has taken such action.

In fact, this is the seventh year of boycotting “white companies” during the holiday season to support a so-called “Black Christmas.”

The Black Xmas website features a list of suggested organisations, companies, and banks to support.

In London, Black-owned businesses are underrepresented compared with the proportion of the capital’s population which is black.

Black-owned businesses comprise 4 percent of all businesses, but 12 percent of London’s population is black.

Black-owned businesses in London have a total turnover of almost £4.5 billion.



Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.