Oh dear Brussels: Leave voter lashes out at 'preposterous' Simon Coveney Brexit response


After Mr Coveney accused the UK of not wanting to resolve issues in Northern Ireland, former Tory MEP Daniel Hannan, labelled his comments as “preposterous”. Amid the row over the European Court of Justice (ECJ), Mr Hannan insisted its role in the Brexit deal must be removed. Indeed, the former MEP accused the EU of attempting to prevent Britain from being competitive.

Writing for The Daily Telegraph, he said: “The idea that the role of the ECJ is a second-order issue for Britain – or even, as the Irish foreign minister, Simon Coveney, suggested, an excuse to break off the talks – is preposterous.

“Coveney should ask himself how Ireland would react if it were suggested that that the way to allow the smooth flow of goods across the border were to follow British regulations.”

During the week, Mr Coveney accused the UK of attempting to “shifting the playing field”.

Mr Coveney also took aim at Lord Frost who accused the Irish official of raising issues via social media.

Mr Coveney added: “Each time that the EU comes forward with new ideas and new proposals to try and solve problems, they are dismissed before they are released – and that’s happening again this week.

“David Frost accuses me of raising issues on social media.

“It’s a bit rich, quite frankly, because he is briefing British media effectively to say, ‘Well, the EU can make the changes that they need to make, but actually it’s not enough, we want more’.”

Despite the UK’s calls for the ECJ to be removed, the EU did not remove the court from its series of measures unveiled last week.

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Mr Hannan added: “If the EU’s actual concerns are the ones it states in public – maintaining the single market without imposing a border – they can be accommodated.

“Britain has already offered a system of mutual enforcement though, frankly, I’m not sure we’re especially fussed about enforcement on the EU side, being ready to trust its standards.

“The trouble is that much of what we have seen these past three years suggests that there are other objectives: preventing Britain from being too competitive; blocking trade deals that might result in our importing food from the Americas rather than Europe; diverting trade, so as artificially to create an all-Ireland economy; and, above all, showing that Britain has paid a heavy price for Brexit.”

As part of its packages of measures, the EU pledged to remove up to 80 percent of checks on goods moving between Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

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In particular, the EU has offered to remove checks on health checks and customs on animal and plant products.

On Thursday, Lord Frost met with Maros Sefcovic to discuss the package put forward by the EU.

Commenting on the EU’s proposal, Lord Frost claimed he had been encouraged by the revisions.

Lord Frost said: We’ve got the commission proposals.

“Obviously ours are on the table as well, so we’re looking forward to good discussions and there’s a lot of work to do because there are gaps.

“I think the EU has definitely made an effort in pushing beyond where they typically go in these areas and we’re quite encouraged by that.

“But obviously there is still quite a big gap.



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