Spain travel at risk amid Malaga outbreak and 5,000 miss flights – latest rule changes


Spain, like the rest of the world, is struggling to contain the spread of Covid. The Omicron variant and super spreader Christmas events are putting holidays in the country at risk.

A Christmas lunch caused an outbreak of Covid cases in Malaga.

The celebration was held by staff from the regional hospital, and experts are warning of dire consequences.

Clara Prats, researcher in Computational Biology at the Catalonia Polytechnic University (UPC) said: “Independently of whether we reach a peak at Christmas, a week before or after, over these dates we will have quite high levels of transmission.”

The Spanish situation is closely monitored by the Government and holidaymakers are facing added restrictions.

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Spain has banned all non-vaccinated Britons from entering the country.

The rule will be reviewed on December 31, affecting all holidaymakers for what’s left of 2021.

Britons hoping to jet off to Spain for a holiday will need to show proof of their vaccination status.

The Spanish Government ruled a negative test could no longer be a replacement for a vaccination pass.

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Two doses are required, with the second dose administered at least 14 days before travel.

Travellers will also need to fill in a passenger locator form to enter the country.

The vaccination rule is particularly problematic for Britons travelling with teenagers.

Children aged 12 to 17 are required to be “fully vaccinated”, which in Spain means to doses.

However, a single jab has been recommended for British teens by the UK chief medical officers.

The new restrictions have already caused chaos at airports.

The Christmas period is already a busy time, and with airports’ lack of resources and Omicron-triggered new rules, holidaymakers could be facing long queues when trying to enter the country.

In Madrid last weekend, 5,000 travellers missed their flights due to queues at passport control.

Britons represent 25 percent of all international passengers at Spanish airports.



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