'Whose army is that, Nicola?' Sturgeon mocked for calling on UK military to solve crisis

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'Whose army is that, Nicola?' Sturgeon mocked for calling on UK military to solve crisis

Nicola Sturgeon has been mocked for begging the UK military for help amid a worsening ambulance crisis north of the border. GB News host Patrick Ch

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Nicola Sturgeon has been mocked for begging the UK military for help amid a worsening ambulance crisis north of the border. GB News host Patrick Christys joked that an independent Scotland might have to rely on the EU army for help in the future, but they “could take several years to arrive”. He said that the ongoing Scottish healthcare crisis damaged the prospects for an independent Scotland.

On Thursday, Ms Sturgeon has officially requested support from the military to deal with pressure on the service. 

The SNP leader also apologised to patients experiencing long waiting times. 

Mr Christys told viewers: “It is a good job health secretary Humza Yousaf didn’t need an ambulance when he hit the floor, because he might have had to wait 40 hours for it.

“The SNP has called in the military to help drive ambulances. Whose military is that? Ah yes, it is the UK’s, of course.”

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He added: “Not only can Scotland not run its own health service, but an independent Scotland would presumably not be able to call on our armed forces to sort it out.

“I suppose they could call the EU army when they inevitably join the Brussels bloc but it would probably take them several years to arrive.

“In Scotland, a man died after waiting 40 hours for an ambulance. A woman waited eight hours for a fractured hip.

“An 86-year-old was left waiting on the floor for eight hours, and a man had to wait 23 hours for help.

On Thursday, the Scottish leader apologised to the family of 65-year-old Gerald Brown, a Glasgow man who died after waiting 40 hours for treatment.

Speaking in Holyrood, the First Minister said: “I apologise unreservedly to anyone that has suffered or is suffering unacceptably long waits.”

The health secretary Humza Yousaf said on Wednesday that people should “think twice” before calling for an ambulance – sparking a furious response from the opposition.

The Conservative leader, Douglas Ross, criticised Mr Yousaf’s comments as “dangerous and reckless”.



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